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20110701
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television in britain. the business consequences of this scandal are still unfolding, but the legal consequences started unfolding years ago. in 2007, a "news of the world" editor and private investigator hired by the paper were jailed for the phone hacking. the editor, andy coulson denied knowing about the hacking but resigned anyway. david cameron then hired that editor, andy coulson, to be a communications director for them. last week he and another editor were arrested for hacking and bribery charges. told about the involvement in the scandal at the time cameron was hiring him. cameron announced an official inquiry. >> after listening carefully, we've decided the best way to proceed is with one inquiry, but in two parts. i can tell the house this inquiry will be led by one of the most senior judges in this country and under the 2005 inquiries act. newspaper reporters, management, pro -- barbara boxer, jay rockefeller and bob menendez have all called for investigations by the justice department and securities and exchange commission. the senators say they want to know if american
or not the scandal engulfing rupert murdoch's media empire, particularly in britain so far, is likely to change that media empire here as well. mr. murdoch's company is not just a massive company, it is massively influential in u.s. politics, particularly in conservative u.s. politics, because his properties here include the "wall street journal," the most influential business newspaper in the country. and also "the new york post," the most influential tabloid newspaper in the country. and the fox news channel, which is a very successful full employment program for republican candidates. when the rupert murdoch scandal broke about bribery and illegal phone hacking as a regular way of doing business at his news properties, rupert murdoch had to drop his $12 billion bid to buy a satellite television channel in britain. had the deal gone through, he would have controlled 40% of all commercial television in britain. here it's 27 tv stations and the "wall street journal" and the fox news channel and "the new york post" and, and, and, and. i think the high noon light of day question to ask about all
the scandal ever closer into the political arena. and think about this, not only has britain lost faith in their journalists, but they've lost faith in politicians and now in the police as well. a point to make is, growing up as a kid in london, you look at scotland yard and stunned by their investigate zeal and incorruptibility, hold on a second, they were taking payments from journalists. >> speaking of fragility, rupert murdoch himself is 80 years old. today he was doddering. much of the question today, somebody tried to pie him in the face, he looked like a mugging victim. how plausible is his claim today he's really not in charge anymore? >> well, i think it's inherently a difficult defense because he might say he can't remember, but that raises questions about his role of chief executive of a prominent, multi-billion dollar business, one of the predatory media companies in the world, so he can defend himself against sort of charges that he knew about criminal activity from british journalists, but that only puts him into deeper water in terms of chief executive and chairman of new
's okay britain is on fire. that's the heart of many of his own interests in terms of the papers and where his own talents are, but in the business sense, not that big of a deal. if the flames went to america, in a sense it already has, les hinton of the wall street journal is out, market cap of news corp. is down, stories like the one i worked on and others bringing culture into question. somewhat important how they contain it, but every ledge they have built, here's rebekah brooks, here's les hinton, the beast keeps eating, the story will not quit. >> does the size of the story, and therefore, the height of the flames and therefore their chance to bridge other continents dpepd on how much damage this does to cameron and the parliament for cameron himself all either resigned or arrested at this point? it seems like the political fallout in britain is still really continuing. >> i think it's all of the pieces that makes the story so darn interesting, tough to look away. wall street journal today suggesting people like you, people like me were far too interested in this and we're engaging b
? is that the extent of his culpability? >> from a business perspective, it's ok that britain is on fire. that's the heart of many of his own interests in terms of the papers and where his own talents are, but in the business sense, not that big of a deal. if the flames went to america, in a sense it already has, les hinton of the wall street journal is out, market cap of news corp is down. there are stories like the one i worked on and others that are bringing broader issues of culture into question. it's really important that they somehow contain it. but every ledge that they have built, ok, here's rebekah brooks, here's les hinton, the beast just keeps eating. the story will not quit. >> does the size of the story, and therefore, the height of the flames and therefore their chance to bridge other continents depend on how much december this does to david cameron and the british government, to have both the head of scotland yard, the number two at scotland yard, and the director for cameron himself all either resigned or arrested at this point? it seems like the political fallout in britain i
absurd that at one point in the fall before britain banned the export, the bbc ran a headline that made you ask, what country is this? what century is this? that line was this. lethal injection drug sold from uk driving school. an unlicensed company was selling lethal injection drugs out of a driving school in west london to corrections departments in the united states of america. at least one state, arizona, reportedly killed a prisoner using drugs imported from the driving school. the federal government responded by seizing the illegally imported lethal injection drugs in at least three states. clearly the old drug was getting harder and harder to buy and hold onto without it being confiscated by the feds, so a number of states decided to stop using it altogether and decided to switch to a new kind of drug, one that is used all the time only not on humans. it's what veterinarians use to euthanize animals. ohio was the first to use it to kill a prisoner in march. a week later, texas made the switch. and now one of the companies that makes that drug is advising american states it should
continents, australia, great britain, and the united states. he was very active in new york city politics, and, you know, up to now, being rupert murdoch it's a particular problem for prime minister cameron, his close aide, andy coulson turned out to have been involved in the phone hacking scandal of "news of the world," so i think it influences why we're talking about him, and it's a good reason to talk about him. >> i think seeing this across the pond dramatically today with the publisher of the wall street journal getting ousted and was a close tie in this, it was his patch on which things went so horriblebly wrong. he's been running the wall street journal for quite sometime as its publisher. what do you think changes in u.s. politics and u.s. media if this crossing the pond thing comes to fruition, how much would that change things that fox news or at the wall street journal or any part of rupert murdoch's empire? >> you could sell fox to the coke brothers. i wonder what would happen at fox news, but i think both of us know, i have a lot of friends and colleagues there who are excell
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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